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Seachem Cupramine

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    Part #: BB-30-02-056502

Product Description

Cupramine effectively eradicates Oodinium, Cryptocaryon, Amyloodinium, Ichthyophthirius, and other ectoparasites of both freshwater and marine fish. It is superior to copper sulfate, chloride & citrate: it is non-acidic, less toxic to fish, remains in solution, and does not contaminate the filter bed. It is superior to chelates: it is fully charged (ionic), active at low concentrations, and is removable with carbon.

There is more than a four-fold concentration gap between the minimal therapeutic dose (0.2 mg/L) and the toxic dose (0.8 mg/L). Cupramine is easily removable with chemical filtration. It is highly effective and safe in freshwater as well as marine water.

Cupramine is appropriate for treating a variety of ectoparasites of both freshwater and marine fish. Below are some of the more common infections treatable with Cupramine. Be aware that many diseases and infections share similar physical and behavioral symptoms, e.g. clamped fins, lesions, loss of appetite.

Ich:

Ichthyophthirius (freshwater) / Cryptocaryon (saltwater)

Looks like salt sprinkled on the fish’s body and fins. Usually accompanied by twitching, flashing, and other signs of stress and irritation. Several parasites are grouped under this name, but the symptoms are almost identical. Ich is among the most common infections of fish, and is entirely treatable with diligence and attention to water quality.

Suggested Treatment Period:

14 days at full concentration (0.25 mg/L for freshwater, 0.5 mg/L for saltwater)

Special Considerations

It is very important with this parasite to maintain the copper concentration for the full treatment period. A drop in the copper concentration will allow the parasite to multiply and reinfect the fish.

Due to the nature of this parasite, it is normal for the visible signs of infection to get worse before they get better. The medication is still working, but it takes some time for the salt-like cysts on the fish to clear out. Keep up the treatment and the visible spots should clear soon!

Velvet:

Piscinoodinium (freshwater) / Amyloodinium (saltwater)

Similar to Ich, but smaller and grey-gold. Most often seen in saltwater, but can occur in freshwater as well. Velvet is less common than Ich, but the treatment is almost identical. We see it more often in saltwater than freshwater.

Suggested Treatment Period:

14 days at full concentration (0.25 mg/L for freshwater, 0.5 mg/L for saltwater)

Special Considerations

Keep in mind that many parasites and diseases will mimic the symptoms of Ich or Velvet, and not all of these are best treated with Cupramine. Often, Flukes or Lymphocystis are mistaken for Ich, and these are better treated with ParaGuard. Research possible fish diseases and, if in doubt, consult an exotic animal vet.

Before Treating

Remove all invertebrates - these are extremely sensitive to copper and will not tolerate treatment with a copper-based medication. Turn off UV filters, ozone filters, and remove chemical filtration like MatrixCarbon and Purigen. Do not use in conjunction with any other medication. Do not use any products which contain reducing agents (conditioners, ammonia binders, etc.) while using Cupramine.

Treatment

If the bottle has a dropper cap, use 20 drops (1 mL) per 40 L (10.5 US gallons) the first day, wait 48 hours, then repeat. On non-dropper caps, each inner ring is 1 mL. In freshwater use half dose. Final copper concentration is 0.5 mg/L (0.25 mg/L in freshwater). Leave at this concentration for 14 days. Do not redose without testing (MultiTest Copper). If tank has ever been treated with an ionic copper (e.g. copper chloride, sulfate or citrate), test copper level after initial dosing. Although most fish tolerate Cupramine to 0.8 mg/L, it is not advisable to exceed 0.6 mg/L copper.

Finish the Full Treatment

Ich, velvet, and many other parasites spend a large portion of their life cycle as a cyst that is immune to medication and hiding in the substrate of your tank. Remember that you need to finish the full treatment even if you can’t see parasites on the fish!

After Treating

Cupramine can be removed using carbon or CupriSorb. Leave the copper-absorbing media in your tank for at least a week after the copper concentration has reached 0 to ensure all traces of the medication have been completely removed.

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